Periodic Audio In-Ear Monitors

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Periodic Audio’s In-Ear Monitors, Mg & Be

Founder and speaker designer Dan Wiggins started Periodic Audio with a focus on portable audio. With a list of credentials that includes transducer design at Sonos and Starke Sound, I was very curious to hear his personally designed single driver IEM (in-ear monitors).

While balanced armature driver IEMs are all the rage (I’ve had a pair for years), Periodic Audio created a simpler design employing a single full-frequency driver without a crossover point. With balanced armature IEMs, you are tuning between multiple drivers for a specific frequency range (think hearing aids), while a dynamic single drivers IEM allow for a more full-frequency response with excellent time-coherence.

These single speaker driver IEMs are available in 3 versions; Mg (magnesium), Ti (titanium), or Be (beryllium). The properties of the speaker drivers, like mass stiffness, and electrical conductivity differ for each metal chosen. In fact a full frequency response chart and specifications for each model can be found on there website. For the sake of this review, I auditioned the magnesium and beryllium driver versions directly connected to an iPhone 6.

Unboxing these IEMs revealed a variety of silicone and memory foam ear-tip size options, adapters for both 1/4 in stereo jacks and an airplane adapter (man those airplanes need updating). I was even told you can experiment with the ear-tips and once you settle on the type/size you like they’ll send you some extra ones- cool customer service. These IEMs are made of polycarbonate with the single driver, port, and hard-wired cable. While I was initially concerned about the build quality with these IEMs, after using them for over 6 months (3 days a week at gym), I am happy to report they are quite sturdy little buds.

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All models include ear tips, 1/4 stereo adapter, & airplane adapter

Mg (magnesium): The entry model ($99) is constructed of 96% magnesium drivers with a N48H neodymium magnet. Everything from the drivers to the volume of the front and rear housing were designed and tooled in-house.

Using the magnesium drivers for some time revealed a favor for mid to higher frequencies, and does so in a way that tips the listener to a revealing top end. The drivers produced an even bass response, but some of the authority and fullness of the deepest bass was bested by the Beryllium drivers. While the mid to higher frequencies are pronounced, I would not call them overtly bright or harsh. Soundstage is decent, but not amazing (yes, I know they are IEM). Articulation of musical attack was good but tighter with the Be driver.

Be (beryllium) ($299): The custom top model from Periodic Audio employs a 100% pure beryllium foil diaphragm with a bonded PEEK surround and N48H neodymium magnets.

Moving onto the beryllium drivers was a major step-up, in every way. Bass became extended and powerful, middle and treble frequencies were better balanced and defined. The control of these drivers allowed for a more intimate sonic view of the mix. The soundstage also had a major benefit from the beryllium driver material- nuanced synth sounds from Herbie Hancock now popped out of hard left and right with piston-like precision.

While headphone amps and DACs will certainly improve these IEM’s sound, I was happy to find they were easily driven by my iPhone 6 heaphone jack/amp.

If I had to knock points to either IEM, it would be the quality and presentation of packaging. While they are supplied with a screw on circular case(cord tangle issues), maybe a zippered pouch would be preferred. A small red dot differentiates right from left ear buds, but man is that dot tiny- can we make it a wee bigger? While it may be obvious I preferred the beryllium driver, let me be clear that the $99 Mg in-ear in no slouch. I recommend taking a listen to each model at the next audio show for your personal preference.

Periodic Audio has managed to bring some thoughtful and musical designs to the in-ear monitor market. This materials based approach offers the consumer options and an education. Real science, real engineers, real transparent.

Anatomy of a Periodic Audio In-Ear Monitor

-happy listening

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Nanotech Systems Japan

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What happens when you disperse nano sized (1-100 nanometers) particles of conductive copper, silver, and gold in deep-sea shark oil? Well, you get a unique product that aims to fill in any uneven gaps with electrical contact points. Think spades, RCA, XLR pins, and Power plugs.

Nanotech Systems Japan has been developing products to improve audio, video, and even automotive experiences for some years now. Beyond the contact points, This company has also designed speaker and power cables with nano particles in a colloidal liquid, More on that in a minute, but first let’s see how this nanotech can be applied.

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Silver nano, half silver half gold mix, and copper nano particles suspended in shark oil

Well, it can be used for just about any electrical contact point. I started off using the silver nano liquid on my speaker cable spades. I was told this would effectively fill in any gaps between the spade and speaker terminal. I also found a use for the copper nano liquid when building power cables and power distribution centers. These nanoparticles (used sparingly) of precious metal ensure that full power transfer is occurring at contact terminals.

I encourage experimentation of application to various contact points in your system. It should be noted that these are enhancers, not cleaners. So beginning with a clean contact is a good start. One experiment I did was with a very worn and noisy guitar cable plug. The solder points were all intact, but for some reason the plug made a noisy connection. I applied the gold contact liquid to the plug and the intermittent noise ceased. Excellent, now to try it in my audio/video system.

As for sonic improvements, these products may indeed help in that area. I recommend that you apply and test for yourself.

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After speaking with Nanotech Systems Japan, I was able to test out fully terminated power cable (Golden Strada) that had been treated with nano particles. Gold and silver nano particles are dispersed in a colloidal liquid, then applied to the full length of conductors in this power cable. In addition, an electromagnetic wave absorption material is also applied to this power cable for reduced interference. This nano liquid, when applied to the full length of conductors may prevent signal jumping -which I suspect is one cause of distortion. See my article on solid core copper vs stranded copper cables.

For my application (audiophile systems), I used this cable to provide power to my power distribution bar (Oyaide MT-UB). I also tested it directly connected to my power amplifier.

With the Golden Strada providing power to my entire distribution bar (which I built with nano copper enhancers) I found a sense of ease and flow to the music which seemed to emerge from a blacker (quieter) background. Initial impressions; Taught extended bass with imaging control. When connected directly to my power amp the Golden Strada truly excelled at bass control/extension and quiet backgrounds.

I especially liked the Golden Strada power cable for picture quality in film. When used for powering a Blu-ray player in my system directly, the contrast and depth of picture was easily improved.

While using other power cables to provide power to my Oyaide MT UB, I found the unique abilities of the Power Strada to shine through when directly connected to my system components. Experimentation is encouraged, and using more than one in an audiophile system will provide varied results – build your own or buy terminated.

Nanotech Systems Japan has created a whole line of DIY products, enhancers, and completed products to improve audio/visual systems. These products are also not excessively overpriced.  If you are ever in the Akihabara neighborhood of Tokyo, I recommend finding some shops that carry these unique science-based audiophile products.

Happy Listening!

The HiFiQC Method For Stereo Microphone Isolation

Schoeps UMS 20 Stereo Bar mounted to Rycote Lyre suspension

ORTF with UMS 20 Stereo Bar mounted to Rycote Lyre suspension

Recording music and sound effects with carefully placed stereo microphones can present some challenges. Since directional microphones are more sensitive to infrasonic noise, special attention should be taken when placing them in various environments. Wind, machines, automobile traffic, and footsteps can all cause rumble or noise to build-up and eventually reach your microphones. The low-frequency nature of these sounds can take up precious headroom in your audio recordings. While wind (blowing on the capsules) can be tamed with various foam enclosures (the W5D is my favorite for Schoeps) don’t forget to isolate mechanical vibrations from reaching your mics too. After trying elastic shockmounts alone, I devised 3-part system to better isolate my ORTF stereo array (also works for MS, XY, and Blumlein) from infrasonic disturbances .

A 3/8 inch mic mount threading adapter allows me to eliminate the 20 mm Schoeps mounting adapter, saving 38 grams of weight

A 3/8 inch mic mount threading adapter allows me to eliminate the 20 mm Schoeps mounting adapter, saving 38 grams of weight

To start, Rycote has a non-elastic suspension made of a super-strong thermoplastic called Hytrel. And unlike elastic, it won’t sag and eventually wear-out (so far, so good). After being impressed with a Rycote Invision suspension for a single Schoeps mic, I decided to see if a solution existed for isolating 2 Schoeps mics arranged on the UMS 20 stereo bar.

After some digging, I came across the Rycote portable recorder suspension and wondered if it might work since the weight of the stereo bar and mics was nearly identical to most portable recorders. As you can see from the picture above, this model easily supports and isolates the Schoeps universal stereo bracket with mics attached.

Carbon Fiber Disc and Sorbothane Hemisphere

Carbon Fiber Disc and Sorbothane Hemisphere

Using a microphone suspension is certainly one method to help prevent vibrations from reaching your mics, but what about infrasonic born vibration from foot traffic, cars nearby, or HVAC compressors. These disturbances can travel up your mic stand and into your microphone.

After experiencing issues from foot steps and traffic rumble, I worked on a solution to isolate the microphone tripod from the ground itself. Both Carbon Fiber and Sorbothane are materials known to dissipate mechanical energy. So, I settled on Sorbothane hemispheres attached to an equal diameter carbon fiber disc.  Sorbothane works best when compressed under a range of weight (depending on size and Duro rating of hemisphere). By choosing a durometer rating of 50 in the 1.5″x.75″ Sorbothane hemisphere, 7-14 pounds of weight on each tripod leg could be isolated.  And after adding some 8 lbs sand bags to my tripod, I was able to get the load heavy enough to make the Sorbothane hemishpere’s truly effective.

Sorbothane being displaced by the weight of microphone stand

Sorbothane being compressed by the weight of microphone stand and sandbags

Lastly, but equally important is making sure your microphone cables do not transmit cable-borne noise to the microphone body. Carefully dressing your mic cables around the tripod is essential to preventing vibrations from reaching your mic. With the help of velcro cable wraps, you can neatly run your mic cables, but don’t forget to pay attention to where and how they are laid on the ground. In some cases you may need to isolate the cable on the ground too.

For those looking for an even smaller stereo mic setup with windjammer possibilities…Check out this ORTF setup with Schoeps CCM mics, Rycote Lyre suspension, and even a Rycote connobox to eliminate cable handling noise!

Happy Recording,

-HiFiQC