Oyaide Electric Company; A Materials Science Approach to Power Distribution 

 

Power Distribution Parts by Oyaide Elec & Acrolink Japan

The Japanese hi-fi market exists alongside a healthy DIY audiophile scene. The Akihabara neighborhood of Tokyo is a great example. One step off the Sobu line and a world of electronics specialty stores become available for professionals and hobbyists alike. One of my favorites, Oyaide Electric shop provides cables, connectors, and parts for building your own audio, video, and power cables/distributors.

Oyaide is a long established electrical wire company that  has been in business since 1952. Over the last 30 years they have grown to develop products for the audiophile and pro audio markets. Materials for Oyaide Elect. are developed and produced in Japan with a combination of technological innovation and traditional craftsmanship.

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 P-004 Beryllium Copper no plating hand polished by traditional Japanese craftsmen

Oyaide power distribution materials are carefully auditioned and produced to provide tonal options for audio enthusiasts and professional musicians. Both the AC wall outlets and power plugs from Oyaide have been developed with several different base alloys and platings.

Their standard 15 amp Power plug and IEC connections (P-004/C-004) have become available with and without the plating of platinum and palladium. This has allowed me to listen to various power cables (Acrolink, Oyaide) and hear how they interact with different plugs and outlets- giving me a better understanding of what the AC conductors sound like, dielectric materials, shielding, and the plugs and outlets they interface with.

After investigating several brass alloys, I have come to appreciate the sonic qualities of the Beryllium Copper alloy when used for AC power in highly resolving audio systems. Beryllium Copper is used for its spring like qualities combined with electrical conductivity. This alloy has corrosion resistance and maintains its original shape due to its ductile properties.

The Oyaide R0 AC duplex is made of beryllium copper for the contacts and PBT (with 30% glass) for the thermoplastic outlet face. Mechanically, the Oyaide duplexes provides excellent AC blade retention, and the PBT and glass filled body helps dissipate unwanted vibration. The R1 employs the same construction but adds a plating of platinum and palladium to the AC receptacles base alloy.

Homemade Power distribution with Oyaide MT UB Power tap case, R0 & R1 outlets

To satisfy my curiosity, I built a passive power distributor from Oyaide called the MT UB. This 2 mm thick brass and nickel/chrome plated 2 duplex box exemplifies Japanese craftsmanship. Four separate mounting poles with special washers allow each duplex to be well isolated from each other. I wired it with high-purity Japanese solid core copper and used one R0 un-plated beryllium copper duplex and one R1 plated with the platinum and palladium. I will try and describe the sonic differences of each outlet below.

Oyaide R0 duplex: This un-plated Beryllium Copper AC outlet provides an un-hyped and natural soundstage when used on analog and digital equipment. Compared to several other outlets with various metal platings, the R0 has provided me with the most neutral sonic presentation, a robust and taught distribution of power without any accent in the audio band.

Oyaide R1 duplex: Beryllium Copper plated with platinum(0.5 μ) + palladium (0.3 μ). This outlet helps create a sound of focused and refined sonic presentation. While the un-plated R0 maintains an organic flow to the music, the R1 also adds a sense of lowered noise floor with some equipment, and I found that digital gear and video (improved contrast and blacks) benefited most from the R1 outlet. While I still hear a neutral presentation (Sonically), the R1 has a highlighting or spotlighting ability, albiet subtle. 

Over the last decade I have been experimenting with various aftermarket power cables and power conditioners. Sometimes with fair results, and sometimes the cables or conditioners have effected the sound negatively. Starting with a materials based approach, I have been able to better understand how different conductors, dialectics, plugs, and  AC receptacles will effect the sound quality of professional and audiophile sound systems. Oyaide Electric company has provided a basis for AC materials to be judged in audio systems, see for yourself.

-Happy Listening

Caution: AC power distributors and cables are serious and should only be built/worked on by trained/licensed professional electricians.

The Focal Spirit Professional – Accurate/Natural Sounding Closed Back Headphones

 

The Textured Finish of the Spirit Pro

The Textured Finish of the Spirit Pro

The bottom line for most field recording engineers goes something like this: “what I hear, better be what I get on this recording.” While great microphones are responsible for the actual pick-up of sound, an accurate pair of headphones is the key ingredient to making sound judgements. Whether one intends to record dialogue or stereophonic information, truly hearing the microphone(s) is essential for quality recording. Strapping headphones over your ears is always a compromise when compared to listening over speakers/monitors, but in some environments it is just unavoidable.

Enter the Spirit Professional headphones from Focal:

Over the past several years Focal has introduced several headphones, and their latest offering is aimed at the professional audio market. These cans sport a textured black spackle-paint for durability and memory foam headband/earpads. The speaker drivers are made of a mylar/titanium material which claims to have a balance of rigidity/lightness and high damping properties. All this engineering is to ensure the transducers are capable of delivering dynamic natural sound reproduction.

Fit and Comfort:

The shape of the ear pads are circumaural, that is, they are designed to rest around the ear. After using these headphones for weeks in the field, I have to say they offer excellent passive noise isolation, but the ear pads tend to press on the outer edges of my ear more than say the Sennheiser HD-600 circumaural design. While the foam used is comfortable , I find the pressure coupled with the slightly smaller pads to limit my use to 45 min- before removing them for relief. This is not a complete deal breaker, as I don’t wear headphone all day and often remove them when between recording takes. Still, if maximum long term comfort are your goals in a sealed headphone, you may want to investigate other options.

Listening:

My first test for these headphones involved using direction microphones. Both Schoeps cardiod and shotgun mics were employed to record a variety of male and female voices in various acoustic environments. Schoeps are know for having an even frequency response across the polar patern. Even so, I was impressed with the Focal Spirit Pro’s ability to translate the slightest of off-axis positions to the human voice being picked up. Yes, the Schoeps have a wider sweet spot than most directional condensers, but getting the best position was aided with use of the Focal headphones.

The Spirit Pro’s also held up well when making stereo microphone adjustments. When I found myself without speakers to monitor, the Focal’s presented enough front-to-back depth and imaging to make appropriate balance adjustments. I certainly still prefer to do this type of balancing with speakers, but to my surprise the Focal’s closed-back design permitted me to hear into a recording, rather than just being a completely flat soundstage, or blob of sound. These headphones also have an excellent frequency response. Even though they are strapped close to your ear, I could hear problematic rumble from infrasound and wind more easily than my previous Sony 7509/7510. With Sound effect recording, these cans reproduces all the nuance that I so often find glossed over with professional headphones.

Focal Spirit Professional-circumaural, memory foam, detachable cable

Focal Spirit Professional-circumaural, memory foam, detachable cable

Listening to Music: 

For the audiophile or music lover that insists on headphone listening, the Spirit Pro’s tell the truth. That is, flaws in recordings stick out, and well engineered recordings sound gorgeous. The comfort of these headphones will prevent most users from wearing them for long periods, and the precise nature of the Focal’s means that most details are more upfront than cans like the Sennheiser HD-600( I know the HD-600 is an open back design, but still a reference from my orchestral recording). As an engineer I don’t mind that the Spirit Pro’s aren’t as gentle or sexy as the HD-600’s. Rather, I’ll take sheer resolution over a laid back sound.

Aside from my own recordings, I chose some familiar recordings such as Buena Vista Social Club, Karajan Beethoven. For Modern recordings I used tracks from Beach House and Stereolab. Listening to orchestral recordings made in halls with lovely acoustics sounded fantastic on the Focal Spirit Pro. Where as modern pop recordings could sometimes benefit from the gentler presentation of the HD-600’s.  While engineering decisions could be made with the Sennheisers, I felt the Focals’s allowed me to more readily hear any issues going on with a recording. For pure listening pleasure, I might look elsewhere as the Focals are more a tool than a pure pleasure listening headphone.

Included Cables; coiled, straight w/ smartphone mic, 1/4 screw on adapter

Included Cables; coiled, straight w/ smartphone mic, 1/4 screw on adapter

If you are looking for a headphone that will help you make decisions about mic placement and EQ adjustments, then the Focal Spirit Pro ranks high in my book. In addition to being solid and neutral in sound, they also do a superb job with passive noise isolation. On the other hand if you are more interested in long term comfort I would look at other models. Even though I have been disappointed with headphones for making sonic decisions in the past, I can clearly say the Spirit Pro gives me an assured even response that allow me to work effectively and efficiently.

 

Associated Equipment:

Sound Devices 744t

Great River MP-2NV

Benchmark Media ADC1

Crane Song Avocet

Meridian Explorer

 

 

Benchmark’s ADC-1 Still Going Strong

Benchmark ADC 1 analog to digital converter

Benchmark ADC 1 analog to digital converter

I’ve been encountering Benchmark Media systems for years. From the earlier days of the modular System 1000 (distributed audio, mic preamps and AD/DA converters) to more recent products like the ADC 1 and DAC1/DAC 2. The DAC 1 made huge impact on the Pro Audio and computer audiophile scene, and now the DAC 2 is providing DSD conversion over USB for even greater file compatibility.

Not quite as popular, but equally impressive is the ADC 1 analog-to-digital converter. And Guess what? The editor over at Stereophile recently revisited the Benchmark unit and sang its praise. He compared it to an Ayre QA-9, and you can read the details here. I’m unsure why he did not compare the two units with the same sample rate, but overall you get the impression that he has appreciated the ADC-1’s  clarity and accuracy.

In my experience, the ADC 1 provided a solid and clear image of my stereo ORTF mics and Omni Flank mics. When paired with a clean mic preamp (Grace, Crane Song Flamingo) you can rest assured that what you hear is what you get.  From Orchestral Recording to Sound Effects, the Benchmark Media ADC 1 provides a sure fire way to get a jitter-free recording, not to mention a great dynamic range.

-HIFIQC

Late Night Listening

Pupshaw and Pushpaw agree! Musical and very resolving!

The Hegel HD20 DAC meets the CI Audio VHP•2 headphone amp. Listening to Bill Frisell’s My Buffalo Girl on a Macbook pro running iTunes/Pure Music with 64 bit math and power-of -two (88.2 Khz) upsampling. The CI Audio Transient MK II is providing the asynchronous USB-to-S/PDIF conversion, and the Hegel HD20 is doing the Digital-to-analog converting. The headphones in use are the classic Sennheiser HD-600 open ear cans. Stereo guitars, big bottom double bass, and the lovely B-3 organ carry you away – off to dream land…

The XX: Coexist album review

I’ve been listening to The XX’s new album titled Coexist on the Young Turks label. Coexist builds on the group’s vocal interplay, rolling bass, and reverb laden guitar with a richer musical sound. The production quality has noticeably improved, especially in the vocals.

While the first album brought these minimalist artists to light at a young age, the second album further strips the group’s layering of sound. You certainly get a more intimate sound and rendering of these artists as a band. I must applaud this since it really gets to the heart of their musical expression. While some musicians would feel naked with less backing instrumentation, The XX still maintain a soulful connection and expression. Just don’t expect varying beats and grooves reminiscent of the first album. The XX decided to strip their sound and work on a slower almost meandering album. New instrumentation like steel drums on the track  Reunion provide a light and floating effect that complement the gentle vocal parts. Reverb quality is stellar, and deep bass drums extend like never before. The track Tides incorporates a simple beat, but they lock in a groove with spaced vocals that beg for your attention. Although the first album is my favorite, I highly recommend checking out this album on CD and LP.